An analysis of the afterlife in the poem thanatopsis by william cullen bryant

Thou shalt lie down An analysis of the afterlife in the poem thanatopsis by william cullen bryant patriarchs of the infant world—with kings, The powerful of the earth—the wise, the good, Fair forms, and hoary seers of ages past, All in one mighty sepulchre.

The oak Shall send his roots abroad, and pierce thy mould. Earth that nourished thee shall claim Thy growth to be resolved to earth again And lost each human trace surrendering up Thine individual being shalt thou go 25 To mix forever with the elements; To be a brother to the insensible rock And to the sluggish clod which the rude swain Turns with his share and treads upon.

He knows death is a conclusion to the material world, but in this conclusion is a type of rebirth. All that breathe Will share thy destiny. So live that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan which moves To that mysterious realm where each shall take 75 His chamber in the silent halls of death Thou go not like the quarry-slave at night Scourged to his dungeon but sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust approach thy grave Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 80 About him and lies down to pleasant dreams.

The oak Shall send his roots abroad and pierce thy mould. Sleep is a time of rest. The oak Shall send his roots abroad, and pierce thy mould.

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And millions in those solitudes, since first The flight of years began, have laid them down In their last sleep—the dead reign there alone. Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant TO HIM who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness and a smile And eloquence of beauty and she glides 5 Into his darker musings with a mild And healing sympathy that steals away Their sharpness ere he is aware.

Bryant believes death prepares the soul for its next journey. All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its bosom. So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, which moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.

And millions in those solitudes, since first The flight of years began, have laid them down In their last sleep—the dead reign there alone. The gay will laugh When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one as before will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come And make their bed with thee.

Earth, that nourished thee, shall claim Thy growth, to be resolved to earth again, And, lost each human trace, surrendering up Thine individual being, shalt thou go To mix for ever with the elements, To be a brother to the insensible rock And to the sluggish clod, which the rude swain Turns with his share, and treads upon.

All that breathe Will share thy destiny. While examining the differences and similarities of death and sleep the reader is left with some very thought provoking questions.

The answers to these questions reassure some readers while confusing others. So shalt thou rest, and what if thou withdraw In silence from the living, and no friend Take note of thy departure? When identifying sleep with death Bryant gives death many characteristics of slumber.

All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its bosom. The golden sun, The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Are shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages.

So shalt thou rest; and what if thou withdraw In silence from the living and no friend Take note of thy departure? By using this strange metaphor I believe Bryant wishes to suggest his faith in an afterlife.

In fact, once the reader gets halfway through the poem they discover that Bryant uses these words almost interchangeably. The gay will laugh When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one as before will chase His favourite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come, And make their bed with thee.

Throughout the poem Bryant creates images which connect death and sleep.

William Cullen Bryant’s Thanatopsis: Summary & Analysis

Earth, that nourished thee, shall claim Thy growth, to be resolved to earth again; And, lost each human trace, surrendering up Thine individual being, shalt thou go To mix forever with the elements, To be a brother to the insensible rock And to the sluggish clod, which the rude swain Turns with his share, and treads upon.

People generally wake from sleep, and Bryant expands this occurrence to death. The gay will laugh When thou art gone the solemn brood of care Plod on and each one as before will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments and shall come 65 And make their bed with thee.

Yet not to thy eternal resting place Shalt thou retire alone, nor couldst thou wish Couch more magnificent.

To him who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness, ere he is aware.

Yet not to thine eternal resting-place Shalt thou retire alone, nor couldst thou wish Couch more magnificent. William Cullen Bryant- To him who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness, ere he is aware.

After waking, the angelic being breaks through the confinement of the human grave, and continues its existence elsewhere. So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, that moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.

Other examples include lines 57 and After reflective meditation in the wilderness Bryant comes to terms with death.Technical analysis of Thanatopsis literary devices and the technique of William Cullen Bryant Poetry / Thanatopsis / Analysis ; Thanatopsis / William Cullen Bryant is best known for writing calm, thoughtful poems about the natural world.

He experimented with a bunch of different kinds of forms and meters, but he showed a pretty consiste. Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant The poem, "Thanatopsis," written by William Cullen Bryant, is a wonderful literary work which explores the often controversial questions of death.

William Cullen Bryant wrote Thanatopsis when he was seventeen years of age. ''Thanatopsis'' is a poem by 19th century poet William Cullen Bryant, written at a time when the poet was questioning his own spiritual beliefs.

The poem reflects the reverence for nature common. The poem, “Thanatopsis,” written by William Cullen Bryant, is a wonderful literary work which explores the often controversial questions of death.

Within his well written lines Bryant attempts to show the relationship between death’s eternal questions and the ongoing cycle of nature and life.

Thanatopsis

Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant To him who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks1 A various language; for his gayer hours. "Thanatopsis" written by William Cullen Bryant inis an explication of death.

Thanatopsis, which is Greek for "meditation on death" (Michael et. al. ), is an exploration into the ambiguity of death and Bryant attempts to show the relationship between death's eternal questions and the continuance of the cycle of nature and life.3/5(4).

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An analysis of the afterlife in the poem thanatopsis by william cullen bryant
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